Nursing Birth

One Labor & Delivery Nurse’s View From the Inside

Sign the Petition! Demand Accurate Reporting of ALL Birth Options!! October 1, 2009

Dear Readers,

 

Choices in Childbirth, a NYC based non-for-profit advocacy group whose mission is to improve maternity care by providing the public, especially childbearing women and their families, with the information necessary to make fully informed decisions relating to how, where, and with whom they will give birth, has recently created a petition in response to NBC’s Today Show segment entitled “The Perils of Midwifery” (later changed to “The Perils of Homebirth” and even later taken off the internet all together!!) speaking out against the segment’s inaccurate, fear mongering, sensationalized, and outrageous portrayal of midwife-attended homebirth, of midwives in general, and of the families who chose this option. 

 

Below is the letter attached to the petition.  If you feel the same way please consider SIGNING.   On October 9th, the last day of National Midwifery week, representatives from Choices in Childbirth will deliver the letter and petition to The Today Show at NBC’s headquarters in NYC.  The goal is to get at least 5,000 signatures by October 9th and as of today, the petition already has 3,653!!!

 

Thank you,

 

NursingBirth

 

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Petition Letter:

 

Dear NBC Producers,

    We, the undersigned, collectively voice our deepest concerns over what we believe has been a gross misrepresentation both of midwife-attended homebirth and of the women who choose this option.

 

While empathizing deeply with the McKenzie family and their loss, we are shocked at the way in which NBC’s “Today Show” chose to portray homebirth as dangerous while choosing to ignore ample medical research that demonstrates its safety in the US and in other developed countries around the world. Not only did the producers of the Today Show ignore journalistic due diligence, they also chose to ignore basic rules of fairness by repeatedly citing doctors and the trade union that represents them while denying midwives and their proponents a voice.   This is simply irresponsible journalism, and misleading to your viewers. We expect more from such a well-respected program.

    We stand in support of families who choose to birth their babies at home with a skilled midwife, not for hedonistic reasons, as the Today Show segment so insultingly suggests, but because they truly believe that it is the best option for themselves and their babies. We support women who choose home birth, who are not following a fad, but who are following their hearts and their informed minds to seek a birth that is both safe and healthy. Far from being a recent trend or fashion, midwifery draws on a continuum of knowledge and experience that goes back many centuries. Midwives are well-trained professionals who specialize in normal birth and provide outcomes that are often superior to obstetrician-attended birth. To suggest otherwise is deeply offensive.
   

The Today Show missed an opportunity to discuss why, despite its near universal reliance on hospital-based, physician-attended obstetric care in birth, America has one of the worst infant mortality rates in the developed world. It missed an opportunity to discuss the reasons why highly educated, thoughtful and responsible women are choosing a home birth with a qualified midwife as an alternative to a hospital birth- an option that other countries have proven again and again costs less money, necessitates fewer c-sections, and provides better outcomes for mothers and babies than our system. The Today Show missed an opportunity to ask why the United States spent $86 billion in 2006 on maternity care that left the US with one of the worst infant mortality rates in the developed world and left women and their families asking for more choices in their maternity care.
   

Although every infant death is a terrible tragedy, the real scandal about birth in the US lies not in the death of the McKenzie’s baby alone, but in the fact that 13.6 African American babies die for every thousand live births; an infant mortality rate that is triple that of Denmark or South Korea. What is truly shocking is not that a fraction of women choose home birth, but that our international infant mortality ranking has worsened from 12th in the world in 1960 to 29th in 2004 during the same period that our rates of medical intervention in birth have gone up exponentially- Cesarean section rates alone have more than tripled. 
   

We are passionate about childbirth issues because we know that, like the rest of the healthcare system in this country, there is much room for improvement.  Drawing battle lines between midwives and doctors and terrorizing the public unnecessarily are hardly constructive means to this end. We call on the Today Show to provide the public with the whole story regarding the evidence and viewpoints supporting the choice of midwife-assisted home birth.

 

We call on the Today Show to choose responsible journalism.

 

 

***SIGN THE PETITION***

 

 

No Doula in the Name of Privacy? Oh Come On! September 26, 2009

This comment was recently left by a reader named Jessica under one of my older posts.  Since I read every comment that is posted on my blog I happened to stumble upon it this morning.  When I read it I couldn’t help but think “I Hear Ya Sister!!!”and felt that it was so well stated that it needed to be its own post!  I know that there are quite a few doulas out there that read my blog and I just wanted to take this opportunity and give a shout out to them all and say thank you for all you try to do to educate women before they get to me on L&D!  Unfortunately, they don’t all listen but I hope you know that there is at least one L&D nurse out there that appreciates your efforts, both before and during labor!!!

 

For all you expecting moms out there please check out DONA’s website to learn a bit more about what a doula is, how you can find one, the effects a doula can have on your birth outcome and experience, and how a doula can advocate for you!

 

And just for the record, there is NOTHING private about a hospital birth experience.  Even in the most well meaning hospitals with the most well meaning birth attendant and the most well meaning nurse(s).  Albeit some women’s hospital births might be more private than others and I personally have had the priviledge to be a part of a few totally amazing hospital births.  But to not hire a doula for your hospital birth (especially at a university hospital!) because you want a “private” experience is a very VERY naive and misguided idea!  I am not saying that to hurt anyone’s feelings and I am certainly not judging anyone out there who decided not to hire a doula for one reason or another.  I am just telling it like it is.  Some food for thought…

 

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Hi NursingBirth!

I am a certifying doula and have recently had an interview with a perspective client. She is 36wks pregnant with her first. She was strongly considering a doula, but everyone else in her family was on the fence, and pushing a “private” birth experience. However, they are planning a delivery at a university hospital, she has yet to see the same health care provider throughout her prenatal care, she has no idea which one will be at the birth, or if it will even be someone she has met. They are planning a natural birth. She assured me that the hospital she is birthing at offers a multitude of birth options, including water birth, birth ball, position changes, etc… and the childbirth education from the hospital has given them confidence in their ability to get what they want from this birth. After much “deliberation” they decided that they were not going to hire a doula, based solely on their confidence in the hospital to give them what they want, and their desire for privacy. While I can completely respect their privacy request, I fail to see how birthing in a university hospital will give her much if any privacy…AND if she doesn’t even know who will be her health care provider at the birth…how is she confident that the hospital will give her what she needs? I wish there was some way to help open her naive eyes to the reality of birth in hospitals today. Her chances of getting to work with a mother friendly doc that understands and respects natural birth have got to be low! Reading your blog was comforting (because I know there are others who struggle with this) and depressing(because we have to struggle with this). I don’t want to have her hire me for her VBAC next time around. I want her to have the birth she desires now. I realize there isn’t much I can do for her at this point, which is why I am here, leaving my frustration with a bunch of like minded individuals. I am hoping things will go well for her and in the mean time, I’ve let her know that I am and will be available until the baby is born. just in case. Thanks for the space to rant.

  

Sincerely,

Jessica

  

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Jessica, you can rant here anytime!!!  I Hear Ya Sister!  Loud and clear!!

 

And now I leave you with one of my FAVORITE Monty Python skits of all time.  I have seen it a million times but it is still as hilarious (and eerily true) each time I see it.  Notice how the doctor invites in an army of people to watch.  It often feels like that where I work no matter what I do!!!

 

 

Seattle Birth Photographer “Honored” To Photograph Birth September 9, 2009

Dear NursingBirth,

 

I came across your blog and I thought you might be interested in seeing the images from the recent home birth I photographed.  I am a professional photographer,  mostly I do portraiture work with mothers and newborns but occasionally I photograph birth.  I love the change of pace and the adrenaline rush : )   I am also a natural birth advocate and gave birth to my son at with a midwife at a free standing birth center.  We are planning to have our next baby at home.  The popularity of birth photography has increased dramatically over the last year – I think signaling a shift in how we think about birth.

 

Here is a link to my blog post about the birth
http://emilyweaverbrownphoto.com/blog/2009/09/birth-photography/home-birth-seattle-birth-photographer/

 

There is a slideshow with all the photos set to music linked at the bottom of the page.  Just scroll down and click the link that says >>The Birth of Waldron Dain Peterson<<.  Take care and happy blogging!

 
Sincerely,

 

Emily Weaver Brown

www.emilyweaverbrownphoto.com

 

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Dear Emily,

 

Your pictures are gorgeous!!!  Makes me want to move to Seattle and have a baby!!  Good luck with your home birth plans and have fun trying for #2!!!  Thank you for the link to your website as I know many of my readers love to read other women’s empowering birth stories and while a photo slideshow isn’t technically a birth story, a picture is worth a thousand words!!

 

While watching Waldron’s birthday slideshow I was so overcome with positive emotions like happiness, awe, empowerment, and especially a deep respect for our strength and abilities as women!  Some of my favorite pictures include:  (1) The one where the mother is bending over in the hallway, her husband is bracing her and her sister is rubbing her back.  I love how you can see the “family picture” in the background because you know that in just a short while they will have a new addition to the family!!,  (2)  The one where the mother is bending at her waist and then looks up with a smile.  She is either in transition or pushing but she still has a smile on her face, knowing what all of this hard work is for!!,  (3)  The “Moment” Shot where mom holds her baby for the first time and looks up at her husband with a face that says “I DID IT!” and “I LOVE YOU!”,  (4)  When “big sister” leans over the tub and is looking up like “Is that my brother!?!”,  and finally (5)  The whole family sitting on the bed together, happy and healthy!!

 

Keep up the good work!!

 

All My Best,

 

NursingBirth

 

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Excerpt from Birth Photography at http://emilyweaverbrownphoto.com/blog/birth-photography/

 

“The birth of a child is one of the most significant and beautiful events in life.  I am always honored when I am invited by families into these very intimate moments to document their memories.  The first moments of life are so precious…the first breath, the first cry, the first time your baby looks into your eyes.  I love documenting these moments for my clients and I know that they will treasure them forever.  The birth of a child is one of the biggest defining moments in your life and you will not regret having it photographed.  Printed images are stronger than memory can ever be and you will be so thankful that you have them to hold onto for your children, your grandchildren, and their children.”

 

In the blog section of her website, photographer Emily Weaver Brown’s writes about why she loves  photographing births, how she met her client Jessica, and why Jessica chose a home birth.  Check out her original post for more information about how Jessica’s labor went!

 

“I loved photographing this birth for many reasons. It’s so difficult to be just an observer, and though I strive to photograph the birth as though I wasn’t even in the room I still get pulled in. Before a birth I meet with my client’s to discuss their wishes and get to know them. (I don’t want to be a complete stranger showing up one of life’s most intimate and raw experiences.) This meeting and the subsequent emails usually leads to friendship and before long I know all about their previous birth stories and all of their hopes and dreams for the birth that I will photograph. So I can’t help but cheer on the moms while they work hard to birth their babies. With Jessica it was no different. Jessica is actually a former client of mine who is now also a professional photographer. I know that she really values photography as an art form and that having the birth of her second child documented in photographs was really important to her.  But even more than that, I knew that the birth of Jessica’s oldest child did not go as she had hoped. She ended up with a healthy baby girl but also a lot of interventions that she didn’t want and it made her feel like she had failed. I had no doubt in my mind that Jessica would be able to birth her second baby at home naturally as she had planed but I so wanted it to go perfectly for her so that she would have a sense of redemption over all that happened during the birth of her daughter.”

 

Please visit http://emilyweaverbrownphoto.com/blog/birth-photography/ and scroll down to the bottom of the page to see two more birth photography slideshows, both of which are hospital births.  Just curious, did any of you feel differently when watching the home birth slideshow vs. the hospital birth slide shows??  Why?

 

The WORST Idea Since Routine Continuous Fetal Monitoring for Low Risk Mothers September 7, 2009

My husband (being the techie cutie that he is) reads CNET news, a website about computers, the Internet, and groundbreaking technology as part of his morning routine.  The other day, while I was enjoying my Kashi cereal and checking out the latest blog posts on my Google Reader, my husband hollered over to me from his office and said,“Hey Melissa, have you heard of LaborPro?”  Until that moment I was having a pretty good Sunday morning.  I mean, I woke up refreshed and smiling, the sun was shining, and I was looking forward to what I felt was going to be a “good” day at work.  But my attitude quickly turned from happy-go-lucky to blinding rage when he uttered those eight little words. 

(Okay, okay, so I think I am being a bit dramatic.  Maybe blinding rage is a bit strong.  But I was pretty upset!!)

So what is LaborPro and why did it put me into such a tizzy you ask?  According to Trig Medical’s website (the Israeli company that is developing and recently won a Frost & Sullivan Technology Innovation of the Year Award for this GARBAGE), LaborPro is “a novel labor monitoring system that using ultrasound imaging measures continuously and objectively fetal position, presentation and station along with cervical dilatation. LaborPro quantitatively assesses and records vital labor parameters in real-time to enable obstetricians to make informed and accurate decisions throughout the labor process to improve both the quality and cost of obstetric care.”

 

 

 

The website lists LaborPro’s capabilities as able to:  

  • Determine continuous station & position of fetal head by ultrasound imaging,
  • Provide radiation-free pelvimetry & birth canal modeling.
  • Perform one-step computerized “non-invasive” trans-vaginal digital examination (I’ll touch on that in moment)
  • Determine intermittent or continuous accurate measurement of cervical dilatation
  • Record comprehensive labor data recording

 

It also toutes its “unique benefits” as the following: 

  • Non-invasive, precise measurement of station & position
  • Improves assessment of non-progressive labor
  • Supports decision-making before operative delivery
  • User friendly, on-screen display of all labor parameters
  • Enhances patient comfort and sense of security

 

Okay okay okay….Just HOW does it do this you ask?  Well it’s EASY!  (*rolling eyes*)  Well according to the website’s one mintute educational video (check it out here, it’s worth it).  FIRST you have to place “just four little electrodes” externally on the mother’s pelvis in order to continuously assess fetal station and position and also enables the user to “recognize CPD early”.  SECOND you just have to clip (or screw) “just a few position sensors” to the woman’s cervix to accurately and continuously measure cervical dilation.  And THIRD you just have to screw “just a small little electrode” into the baby’s head.

Fetal Scalp Electrode  (notice the little corkscrew tip)

Close up of a fetal scalp electrode, or FSE (notice the little corkscrew tip, that screws into the baby's scalp.)

According to Frost & Sullivan, the organization that awarded Trig Medical for the LaborPro technology writes, “The LaborPro is staff and mother-friendly and requires only basic training in ultrasound usage, obviating the need for an obstetric ultrasound expert,” adds Ms. Prabakar. “Moreover, the technology employs non-invasive, radiation-free pelvimetry as well as a single-step computerised digital examination. All labor progress tracking data including the fetal heart rate monitor are integrated in the LaborPro display and automatically recorded by the system, which helps reduce staff workload.”

 

Oh great!  We only need “basic ultrasound skills” to work it!  (*double eye rolling*)  Here’s a novel idea!  How about every hospital (including my own) in the United States that has a L&D floor actually provide labor support training to their nurses instead!  That would go a lot farther for us than freaking ultrasound skills!! 

(Just for the record, my hospital does NOT include labor support training as part of orientation and we are NOT alone.  At my hospital, if you want to learn how to provide labor support you have to seek out other learning opportunites on your own, like I had to.  But we do get extensive training on how to work and interpret the fetal monitor.  Oh and about 1/3 of our three month orientation is dedicated to learning how to care for a patient who is being induced.  In fact, I had to teach myself how to do intermittent auscultation and hence, I am one of the only nurses that I work with that isn’t “scared” of intermittent auscultation and will actually advocate for it!) 

The most terrifying thing is that although at this time LaborPro is not available in the United States (Oh Hallelujah!!!) there is another company called Barnev based out of Andover, MA that has developed an almost identical product they call BirthTrack™ Continuous Labor Monitoring System which they describe as “a revolutionary continuous labor monitoring technology that provides obstetric caregivers invaluable, precise, objective, real-time information about the physical progress of labor. The BirthTrack System provides tools for a more informed decision making process through which hospitals can reduce the risks and costs of childbirth and assure the safety and comfort of mothers-to-be and their babies.”  I remember hearing about this product a couple of years ago when it was still in “development.”  Well guess what?!  Development is over!!  Marketing here we come!!  (GAG me!)

 

So now there are at least TWO companies that are actively marketing this HORRIFIC, INHUMANE, and OUTRAGEOUS product.  Just wait  until LaborPro makes it to the United States (which according to their website they are actively persuing).  Then they will probably start to compete with eachother!  Now now only will labor & delivery wards around the country have to deal with Similac and Enfamil representatives competing for our money and attention in house (which already makes me sick to my stomach), but now I have to worry about this??!!  THIS IS TERRIFYING!!!

 

I’m telling you right now, I will UP AND QUIT my job and never look back if either LaborPro or BirthTrack EVER  appears in even just one, JUST ONE of my hospital’s labor rooms.  QUIT ON THE SPOT!  And I will make a Hollywood exit too!  A HUGE scene!!!  Hooting and hollering!  You just wait!!  LOL!  As if our moms aren’t already strapped down enough with the often unnecessary and sometimes downright harmful technology we already have.  This is just TOO MUCH TO BEAR!

I have taken care of MANY a laboring woman (often as a result of an induction, mind you) who are connected to:

 (1)  an IV line with IV fluids and Pitocin running through,

(2) an electronic fetal monitor to measure fetal heart rate,

(3) a tocodransducer to measure contraction pattern

(OR a fetal scalp electrode to measure fetal heart rate and an intrauterine pressure catheter to measure contraction frequency and strength),

4) an epidural catheter in the back giving a continuous flow of anethetic and narcotic medications into the spinal column,

(5) a foley catheter in the bladder since it is very rare that one can empty their bladder with an epidural,

(6)  a pulse oximeter to continuously measure blood oxygen level (necessitated by the epidural),

(7) a blood pressure cuff to record one’s blood pressure every 15 minutes since an epidural can drop your blood pressure dangerously low, and finally

(8) if the baby has shown any signs of distress, an oxygen mask for your face!

 

Well I have a message for both Trig Medical and Barnev, LABORING WOMEN DO NOT NEED ANY MORE THINGS SHOVED UP THIER VAGINA!!!!  And furthermore,  CLIPING ANYTHING TO A WOMAN’S CERVIX OR SCREWING ANYTHING INTO A BABY’S HEAD DOES NOT COUNT AS “NON-INVASIVE”!!!  LABORING WOMEN AND BABIES ARE NOT ROBOTS THAT DON’T FEEL ANY PAIN OR DISCOMFORT!!!!  RESEARCH HAS SHOWN TIME AND TIME AGAIN THAT LESS IS MORE WHEN IT COMES TO LABOR FOR HEALTHY MOMS AND BABIES!!!  CONTINUITY OF CARE IS MUCH MORE EFFECTIVE, LESS PAINFUL, LESS INVASIVE THAN ANY “COMPUTERIZED FINGER.”

Furthermore, LaborPro and BirthTrack are a slap in the face to every labor and delivery nurse that cares about giving appropriate, effective, competent, physiological, and compassionate care to childbearing families.   Unfortunately I would bet my hard earned money that at least half of the doctors I currently work with would think that this is a good idea. 

Okay, okay, now that I am all riled up again I have to go to work  :(   Please check out Rixa’s post over at Stand and Deliver about BirthTrack.  It was written about a year ago and I stumbled upon it when I was searching for a picture of a fetal scalp electrode!!

Change has GOT to come!  It’s GOT to!  For the health and wellness of our mothers and babies!!  Remember ladies, YOU actually have more power than ME and all the other L&D nurses out there!!  That’s right!  If you do not hire birth attendants that do not support evidenced based medicine and physiological birth and do not patronize hospitals that do not support a family-centered approach to maternity care then and only then will they start to listen.  You know why?  Because when the customers aren’t comin’, it hits them where it hurts… in their WALLET!!

 

NursingBirth makes TOP 50 Best Blogs List!!!

Filed under: In The News,Just For Fun — NursingBirth @ 8:28 AM
Tags: , , , ,

Good news everyone!!!  (Any Futurama fans out there?  Anyone?  Haha!)

 

Last month NursingBirth was included in NursingDegree.net’s 50 Best Blogs for Neonatal Nurses!  I am in good company too as some of my favorite blogs made the list including: At Your Cervix, Stork Stories, Birthing Beautiful Ideas, Stand and Deliver, The Unnecesarean, Our Bodies Our Blog, Pushed Birth, Enjoy Birth Blog, Woman to Woman Childbirth Education, and Science and Sensibility just to name a few!  Check out my blog roll to the right for links to any of these blogs!

 

50 Best Blogs for Neonatal Nurses

 

The cool thing is that while I don’t think the numbers actually mean anything, I was ranked #17 which happens to be my FAVORITE number!  (That’s right, I have a favorite number.  And a favorite color too!  ….it’s purple if you were wondering!!) 

 

Thanks to all my readers for reading!!  I certainly wouldn’t have made the list if it wasn’t for you!!!  Last time I checked I had 84,552 hits to my blog since I started in February.  WOW!!!!  You all amaze me on a daily basis!!

 

All My Best,

 

Melissa

aka “NursingBirth”

 

Believe! A Tear-Jerkin’ Inspirational Midwifery Ad September 4, 2009

The other day I stumbled upon a YouTube video advertisement for a midwife in Albuquerque, New Mexico via a friend’s facebook page.  You’d think that I must get sick of watching videos of births and babies since I am, after all, a labor and delivery nurse but alas, I am a true birth junkie and just can’t get enough!!  I don’t know anything about the midwife in the movie but I have to say that not only do I BELIEVE everything she quotes in the video but I wish that every health care professional that provides care for childbearing familes felt and practiced the same way as she does! 

 

I believe that every mother DESERVES a midwife and that every baby DESERVES to be born into gentle hands!

 

 

 

The following is from Citizens for Midwifery:

 

The Midwives Model of Care

The Midwives Model of Care is based on the fact that pregnancy and birth are normal life processes.

The Midwives Model of Care includes:

  • Monitoring the physical, psychological, and social well-being of the mother throughout the childbearing cycle
  • Providing the mother with individualized education, counseling, and prenatal care, continuous hands-on assistance during labor and delivery, and postpartum support
  • Minimizing technological interventions
  • Identifying and referring women who require obstetrical attention

 

The application of this woman-centered model of care has been proven to reduce the incidence of birth injury, trauma, and cesarean section.

Copyright (c) 1996-2008, Midwifery Task Force, Inc., All Rights Reserved.

 

Natural VBAC Hospital Birth: One Reader’s Empowering Experience September 3, 2009

Dear NursingBirth,

  

I wanted to share with you my birth story.  I thought since I did an all natural VBAC, it might be something you would want to share.  Thanks for the posts.  YOUR blog helped me get though my second birth! Your stories of inspiration that you have are amazing, and just your general  tone.  The fact that there are nurses out there like you made me have the confidence to trust the nurse with me, but also not be totally trustworthy. It helped me realize that I am the final decision maker.

 

In preparing for my VBAC I read your Injustice in Maternity Care Series and your story “I Needed to Know My Body Could Do It!”: A VBAC Story over and over.  I also read Active Birth by Janet Balaskas which I think helped me a lot, and with our first daughter (my c-section) we took Bradley classes so we both thought we were so prepared.  This time I had my mom, a friend and my husband as my birth team and we took control, which reading about it from your point of view gave me the courage to do so!!!


Thanks for all you do!  I love the blog!

 

Sincerely,

Katie C.

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Dear Katie C.,

 

I would LOVE to reprint it and am honored that you would even send it to me!  Thank you for reading and THANK YOU for being such an awesome and empowered woman and mother!!  It is women like you that are an inspiration to ME!

 

I just love everything about your birth story!!  First off, CONGRATULATIONS on your VBAC and on the birth of your daughter!!  What a wonderful time for you and your family!  It also must be really nice to NOT have to recover from major abdominal surgery and take care of a newborn and 3 year old!  Second, one HUGE pat on the back to you for choosing to go back home during your initial trip to the hospital when you were found to be 2 centimeters.  That took A LOT of courage and trust in your body and your abilities, especially since the on-call doctor was pressuring you to stay.   And I completely agree with you; choosing to labor at home until you were more “active” most definitely had a significant impact on your successful unmedicated VBAC.  Thirdly, KUDOS to you for being an active participant in your birth!!  It no doubt helped your labor progress to be upright and moving during your labor!  I am so proud of you!!  While it’s true that no one can really “plan” their birth, you did everything you absolutely could to stack the cards in your favor!!  Yay!  Yay!  Yay!!!

 

Thank you again for reading and sharing!

 

All My Best,

NursingBirth

 

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Katie C’s VBAC Birth Story

College Station, TX

 

Starting on Friday, May 22, I started having very mild but consistent contractions at 5 minutes apart at lunch time.  The rest of the day they came and went, some getting farther apart but stronger slowly as the day went on.  I also had a lot of brownish and pinkish spotting.  Figured that maybe I was in very early labor.  Did my usually stuff that day and went to bed about 9:00pm, just in case this was it. Saturday morning I woke up about 1:00am with contractions strong enough that I couldn’t sleep.  I got up and ate some peanut butter toast and drank a bunch of water and tried to go back to sleep.  Contractions were about 7 minutes apart but stronger and enough so that I was having a hard time sleeping.  Likely because I was excited.  Got up and took a bath but that didn’t help.  Tried to go back to sleep.  Got up and ate 2 huge bowls of apple cinnamon cheerios.  Finally fell back asleep about 4:30 am.  Woke up at 7am and was just very tired.  Contractions were completely bearable but figured that we were starting (maybe) and so I had Madison go to Jaxson’s (and George and Amie) house for a few hours while my mom and I stayed home to see if anything would progress.

 

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #5:  Eat and drink as your body tells you to. Drinking plenty of fluids during labor will keep you from getting dehydrated and give you energy.

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #5: Eat and drink as your body tells you to. Drinking plenty of fluids during labor will keep you from getting dehydrated and give you energy.

 

As the day went on they got stronger but not really closer.  I called L&D and she said 3-5 minutes apart, not able to talk through them, so I just figured I would wait.  Wasn’t ready to go to the hospital yet anyway.  I called Meredith (a friend), who was working about 2 hours away, to let her know that she might have to come back that night. We decided that she would come back that night instead of waiting for a call at 2:00 am and have to drive then.

 

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #6: Think carefully about who you want to give you support during labor and birth. Consider hiring a doula or other professional labor support person to give you, your partner, and any other support person who's with you, continuous emotional and physical support.

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #6: Think carefully about who you want to give you support during labor and birth. Consider hiring a doula or other professional labor support person to give you, your partner, and any other support person who's with you, continuous emotional and physical support.

 

My back started hurting and I called another friend of mine who does massage. She wanted me to come to her studio, but I really didn’t want to leave the house, so I decided to stay home. Rob called his mom and went to meet her and take Madison to her house so that we wouldn’t have here with us. By the time Rob got back, about 6:30pm, contractions were 5 minutes apart and getting stronger. I could still talk and walk, but it took effort. I called Meredith back and she said she was on her way to my house. At 7:30pm I started to panic.  The contractions seemed very strong to me, I was concentrating on them and they were consistently 5 minutes apart, so we decided to head to the hospital.  I called Meredith and told her to meet us there.  Once I got there, my contractions stopped pretty much, likely due to my nerves.  They got me into a room and set and checked me and I was 2cm and 80% effaced.  I was devastated!  I told them I wanted to go home.  The doctor on call was leery of that since I was a VBAC and they said they would really like me to stay but I refused and we packed up and came home.  (In hind site, this was the reason it all worked out!! Best Decision!!!)

 

 

I went to bed disappointed and tired, since I had been contracting for nearly 30 hours at this point and I just wanted to either be in labor or not.  I ate a snack and went to bed.  At about 3:00am I was woken by very strong contractions, 7 minutes apart, strong enough that I would flip to hands and knees in bed and rock and moan through them. Rob decided I was in labor, though I was still not sure!  LOL!  I started just sleeping in between them.  (Must have been some natural coping mechanism, since I did it until about 6:30 am!)  We started timing for real at 7:00am.  Meredith came over and she helped my mom.  My mom would time the start to start and Meredith would time the duration. They were about 5 minutes apart with about 30 seconds of what I would call pain.  The actual contraction would last about a min or longer.

 

 

As the morning went on, I could no longer do anything during the contractions except hang onto Rob and moan.  Contractions got stronger and longer.  They were 4-5 minutes apart, and lasting (pain) about 70 seconds.  During one contraction while I was hanging on to Rob I had a huge rushing feeling, almost like a pushing sensation (or so I thought) so I just said, “We have to go NOW!” We packed up and went up to the hospital.  I had 4 contractions in the car, which were the hardest ones!  [At that point I preferred to be standing during them, since sitting or lying down was excruciating.] We got back to the hospital and I was moaning and hanging on Rob and everyone in the ER was looking at me funny.  It made me laugh.  They probably all thought I was crazy!  

 

 

I went back up to L&D and they put me in the same room and got me all set up again.  The nurse said, “We were waiting for you!” I was so nervous that I would only be 3 centimeters and they wouldn’t let me go!  She checked me (about 11:00am) and I was 6cm, fully effaced!!!  I cried when she told me, I was so happy!!  Rob, Mom and Meredith clapped!  LOL!  They told me I had to stay.  I said that was fine!  They put me on the monitors and said I would be able to get off of them, but then the Dr. on call said “NO!” so I was worried I would be stuck in bed.  The nurse said, “You can move as much as you want, so long as the cord is long enough,” so I got out of bed and stood next to it for most of the day.  We said I didn’t want to be checked again except by the doctor or if they thought I was complete (i.e. pushing) so when the doctor got there at 1:00pm she checked me and I was a stretch 8!! I was still concerned that it wasn’t going to happen, but everyone else was excited.

 

Lamaze International's Tip #4 for a Normal Birth: Plan to move around freely during labor. You'll be more comfortable, your labor will progress more quickly, and your baby will move through the birth canal more easily if you stay upright and respond to the pain of your labor by changing positions. Try rocking, straddling a chair, lunging, walking and slow dancing.

Lamaze International's Tip #4 for a Normal Birth: Plan to move around freely during labor. You'll be more comfortable, your labor will progress more quickly, and your baby will move through the birth canal more easily if you stay upright and respond to the pain of your labor by changing positions. Try rocking, straddling a chair, lunging, walking and slow dancing.

 

Transition for me was the second hardest thing I have ever done.  I refused pitocin (which they really didn’t push since I was a VBAC) and did not let them break my water. I stayed at a 9 centimeters for almost 3 hours, then at 9 ½ centimeters for a while until I begged them to stretch my cervix!!  LOL!  I was on the bed with the back raised on my hands and knees and suddenly had a contraction that felt better when I kinda of pushed at it. My mom went to get the nurse and she tried to check me like that but said I really needed to lie down.  I said I didn’t want to push lying down and she said, “Sweetie you can push however you want, but I need to make darn sure you are complete so you don’t swell.” I knew that was true so I got down and she checked me and then had the doctor come in and doctor said, “I’d call that complete!” I was so freaking happy! However I was also exhausted and once I was lying down, though I was hurting, I just couldn’t get back up again.  They broke my water sometime in there.  [I think it was earlier when I was at a 9 ½ centimeters but I can't remember.]

 

 

The first few pushes I really thought I was doing it but I think the contractions were just not strong enough.  I actually asked the doctor how far down Hana had to be to use the vacuum!  I was exhausted!  The doctor said that she wasn’t going to use the vacuum, so I was just going to have to push!  I started pushing about 4:45 pm.  She would come down (once I finally figured out just how freaking hard you have to push!!) and then scoot back in.  They explained to me that a little bit of pitocin would help to bring the contractions a little closer together, so I would be more effective in pushing, since I was having over a minute between them and Hana would just scoot back in.  I finally agreed to it at about 5:45pm.  The started it at about 6pm.  The doctor suggested a pudendal block, in case I needed an episiotomy (which while I wanted a natural tear, I wasn’t against at that point and I never thought I would come through it with no tear or cut).  I even got a mirror to see my progress, and knew right then that something was going to have to give! I made them put the mirror away!

 

 

I started pushing 5-6 times per contraction and the doctor had been with me the whole time.  She had them break the bed and get all the stuff ready and I asked “Is she coming out this way?” and the doctor laughed and said, “I’m not doing a c-section today!” She asked me also if I wanted to feel Hana’s head, but I just couldn’t bear the thought for some reason.  I kept pushing and finally she said, “Ok, this next one you’re going to have your baby!” and so I hauled back and pushed harder than I thought possible and her head popped out and I kept pushing (oops!!) and Hana was born Sunday May 24th at 6:28pm!!!  It was the most amazing thing in my life and no doubt pushing was the hardest thing in the world.

 

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #10: Keep your baby with you after birth. Skin-to-skin contact keeps your baby warm and helps to regulate your baby's heartbeat and breathing. Keeping the baby with you in your room helps you to get to know your baby, respond to your baby's early feeding cues and get breastfeeding off to a good start.

Lamaze International's Tips for a Normal Birth #10: Keep your baby with you after birth. Skin-to-skin contact keeps your baby warm and helps to regulate your baby's heartbeat and breathing. Keeping the baby with you in your room helps you to get to know your baby, respond to your baby's early feeding cues and get breastfeeding off to a good start.

 

They gave her to me and after a few minutes (she was breathing but a little blue still) they took her over to rub her and clean her up some.  I was shaking so bad at that point that Rob had to hold her. I ended up with a 4th degree tear… not from her head, but her shoulder popped out when I pushed and the doctor wasn’t expecting it, and so that’s that.  But it isn’t so bad!  She stitched me up, and while it is sore, it beats the hell out of a c-section! Right after she was born I said, “I had a baby out of my vagina!” much to the amusement of the nurses and pretty much everyone in the room! But I can’t tell you just how amazing it was for me. I had been waiting 3 years for that.  And now I have it!  Hana was given back to me and she latched on right away and nursed like a champ for 15 minutes on each side (I was STILL being sewn up!) and finally Rob and Hana went off to the nursery.  To our surprise (and the doctor’s too) she was 8lbs 1 oz, 19 inches long.

 

Happy Birthday Hana!!!!

Happy Birthday Hana!!!!

 

 

I am recovering very well and almost feel like new!!

 

For more information on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) check out the International Cesarean Awareness Network's website at http://www.ican-online.org/

For more information on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) check out the International Cesarean Awareness Network's website at http://www.ican-online.org/

 

 
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